federyk-is-a-rising-demon:

trebrond:

Dr. House in a nutshell

not even in this fandom but i’m laughing

federyk-is-a-rising-demon:

trebrond:

Dr. House in a nutshell

not even in this fandom but i’m laughing

(via shylabeef)

vbartilucci said: The Wife has finished her first novel, and editing her second. She's now stuck at the torturous point where she has to start shopping it to agents. Which means she's going to show it to the first people who might say they don't like it. Care to give her, and all the folks at the same place, a pep talk?

neil-gaiman:

Not really. I mean, if she’s scared of agents, well, they’re a cake walk. They’ll either say no, they don’t want to represent you, or yes, they do. Nice and simple.

After them, you get publishers and editors and copy editors, all with opinions and the ability to buy or reject a book, or to ask for changes. And it gets worse if you do get published, because the reviewers will be waiting, and some of them won’t love every word of the book and will tell the public, and if you think that reviewers are bad, well, the published books are going to head out into the hands of the reading public, and every single one of them will have an opinion and they will tell you on Amazon or on GoodReads just how many stars your book is worth, and even a book that wins the GoodReads award as the fantasy of the year, with 126,600 reviews, is going to have over 2,200 one-star reviews. (That’s only 1.7%, but still, 2,200 people really hated it and many of them will undoubtedly tell you why…)

The best thing to do is write a book you are proud of, and then let it go and let people read it. It’s a good thing that not everyone likes the same thing. That’s what allows different writers to make a living.

arcaneimages:

The power of persistence. Harry Bernstein wrote 40 books but destroyed the manuscripts after they were all rejected by publishers. Bernstein was 93 when his wife of 67 years died and started writing to help deal with his grief. He spent 3 years writing his memoir “The Invisible Wall.”

He sent the manuscript to many New York publishers, all of whom turned it down. Then he sent it to an editor at Random House in the UK, where it sat in a pile of unsolicited manuscripts for a year before it was read by a stunned publishing director who immediately recognized it as inspired writing. It was published in 2007 when Mr. Bernstein was 98. He would write three more acclaimed books, all of which were published, up until his death at 101. Bernstein called his 90s, “the most productive years of my life.”
This made me really happy actually. Everything in this world especially entertainment and online, tells us our lives, creative or otherwise, are over after 40. I’m turning 50 next year and looking forward to creating and blowing deadlines until I die.

arcaneimages:

The power of persistence. Harry Bernstein wrote 40 books but destroyed the manuscripts after they were all rejected by publishers. Bernstein was 93 when his wife of 67 years died and started writing to help deal with his grief. He spent 3 years writing his memoir “The Invisible Wall.”

He sent the manuscript to many New York publishers, all of whom turned it down. Then he sent it to an editor at Random House in the UK, where it sat in a pile of unsolicited manuscripts for a year before it was read by a stunned publishing director who immediately recognized it as inspired writing. It was published in 2007 when Mr. Bernstein was 98. He would write three more acclaimed books, all of which were published, up until his death at 101. Bernstein called his 90s, “the most productive years of my life.”

This made me really happy actually. Everything in this world especially entertainment and online, tells us our lives, creative or otherwise, are over after 40. I’m turning 50 next year and looking forward to creating and blowing deadlines until I die.

(Source: USA Today)

My laptop is dead. I’m going to be without one for a while, I don’t really have a means of getting another. For a long time I’ve dreaded this day but now that it’s arrived I am surprised at how indifferent I am about the whole thing.

For the last few months I’ve been obsessively editing videos, dozens and dozens of them. All my free time dedicated to conceptualizing and editing videos. Now I can’t do it anymore and even that doesn’t bother me. At all.

I guess because I’ll just move onto something else. Writing probably. Everything seems to come back around to writing eventually.

Now I have a machine gun. Ho Ho Ho.

Now I have a machine gun. Ho Ho Ho.

thefilmstage:

BREAKING: there will be a long dolly shot in Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice. 470 feet long, to be exact.

thefilmstage:

BREAKING: there will be a long dolly shot in Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice.

470 feet long, to be exact.

(via nationalfilmsociety)

nationalfilmsociety:

Eureka! I have found it.

The 400 Blows (1959). Directed by François Truffaut.

(Source: elledrivers)

steveagee:

This is the best. THE. BEST! (I’ve posted this before, but it’s still THE. BEST)

bloodsplatteredcinema:

Blood Splattered Cinema: The Gore Gore Girls

This week on Blood Splattered Cinema the Horror Guru takes on another H.G. Lewis splatter classic: The Gore Gore Girls, starring Frank Kress, Hedda Lubin, Amy Farrell & Henny Youngman.  Many horror fans consider this 1972 tale of Go Go dancers gone wild to be the ultimate culmination of Herschell Gordon Lewis’ career - Mainly because it was his last film up until 2002’s Blood Feast 2.  But does it really live up to this reputation? Click play to find out! ;)

commanderholly:

I like, nearly teared up at this. 

Joss getting right to the source

(via dexbonus)

DCB: TYRRELL:

durgapolashi:

I’m a loner. I don’t like beautiful people, but I find beauty in the grotesque. And in the sweet soul inside someone who has been able to get through their life without being a rat’s ass. Such people should be collected, should be swept up immediately and kept in a box of broken people. I’ve…

1 year ago - 22
This is an amazing woman.

This is an amazing woman.

lauramcphee:

Susan Sarandon (Mikki Ansin)

Total babe

lauramcphee:

Susan Sarandon (Mikki Ansin)

Total babe

(via therealmccoy)

I love to be alone. I never found the companion that was so companionable as solitude.

Henry David Thoreau, Walden (via liquidnight)